Rate Hospitals
Search Hospital by:
--Select-- Name City State

The Resurgence of Multi-drug-resistant Tuberculosis

, The Resurgence of Multi-drug-resistant Tuberculosis

Hospital-resistant bacteria such as MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) have become a widespread problem. Antibiotic resistance is now a major topic in the medical community, specifically what measures might be available to counter bacteria or viruses that have developed beyond not only conventional treatments, but also drugs of last resort. Hospitals worldwide are in the process of rolling out programs to minimize the spread of hospital-resistant bacteria, including new sanitation and sterilization protocols that minimize the chances for bacterial populations to transmit their antibiotic resistance through reproduction.

These new fast-response protocols may be useful in developed nations, where hospitals are typically staffed with an abundance of medical professionals with specialized training, but what about developing nations? Medical facilities in underdeveloped nations often face critical shortages of medical facilities, medications, and specialized skill sets. They may not have the personnel on hand to recognize hospital-resistant bacteria when they see it, and not coincidentally, this has produced several widespread health problems in dense population centers in developing nations.

Developed nations are by no means immune to the problems that antibiotic resistance can cause. For example, conventional cancer treatments like chemotherapy use harsh chemicals to reduce the size of cancerous tumors prior to surgical removal. These drugs have a number of serious side effects, with a suppressed immune system response among them. If cancer treatment drugs are administered improperly, the resulting antibiotic resistance that emerges may make cancer patients prime candidates for multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). Drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is an even more potent worry for the healthcare industry, given that there are so few effective treatment options for patients.

With strains like MDR TB, XDR TB, and MRSA making their presence known in hospitals and in communities, medical researchers have never had more incentive to discover new methods of effective treatment. Emphasis is currently being placed on finding methods that remove the potential for misapplication (such as patients who cease taking antibiotics before their bacterial infections are destroyed, leaving a portion of the bacteria population with antibiotic resistance). Such methods include finding ways to disrupt bacterial and viral reproductive cycles before invasive populations overwhelm the immune system’s response. Nanotechnology, a scientific discipline which focuses on manipulating the properties of matter at extremely small scales, may help in designing “smarter” molecules that are capable of disrupting bacterial and viral reproduction in new ways that minimize harmful side effects on human patients. This would mirror developments in drug delivery for cancer patients, where nanotechnology has allowed for the possibility of drugs that will be able to differentiate between cancerous tumors and healthy tissue.

Hospital-resistant bacteria such as MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) have become a widespread problem. Antibiotic resistance is now a major topic in the medical community, specifically what measures might be available to counter bacteria or viruses that have developed beyond not only conventional treatments, but also drugs of last resort. Hospitals worldwide are in the process of rolling out programs to minimize the spread of hospital-resistant bacteria, including new sanitation and sterilization protocols that minimize the chances for bacterial populations to transmit their antibiotic resistance through reproduction.

These new fast-response protocols may be useful in developed nations, where hospitals are typically staffed with an abundance of medical professionals with specialized training, but what about developing nations? Medical facilities in underdeveloped nations often face critical shortages of medical facilities, medications, and specialized skill sets. They may not have the personnel on hand to recognize hospital-resistant bacteria when they see it, and not coincidentally, this has produced several widespread health problems in dense population centers in developing nations.

Developed nations are by no means immune to the problems that antibiotic resistance can cause. For example, conventional cancer treatments like chemotherapy use harsh chemicals to reduce the size of cancerous tumors prior to surgical removal. These drugs have a number of serious side effects, with a suppressed immune system response among them. If cancer treatment drugs are administered improperly, the resulting antibiotic resistance that emerges may make cancer patients prime candidates for multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). Drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is an even more potent worry for the healthcare industry, given that there are so few effective treatment options for patients.

With strains like MDR TB, XDR TB, and MRSA making their presence known in hospitals and in communities, medical researchers have never had more incentive to discover new methods of effective treatment. Emphasis is currently being placed on finding methods that remove the potential for misapplication (such as patients who cease taking antibiotics before their bacterial infections are destroyed, leaving a portion of the bacteria population with antibiotic resistance). Such methods include finding ways to disrupt bacterial and viral reproductive cycles before invasive populations overwhelm the immune system’s response. Nanotechnology, a scientific discipline which focuses on manipulating the properties of matter at extremely small scales, may help in designing “smarter” molecules that are capable of disrupting bacterial and viral reproduction in new ways that minimize harmful side effects on human patients. This would mirror developments in drug delivery for cancer patients, where nanotechnology has allowed for the possibility of drugs that will be able to differentiate between cancerous tumors and healthy tissue.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>